Jewish Learning and Fellowships

For an exhaustive listing of our educational opportunities, CLICK HERE

 

Jewish Learning Fellowship

JLF is a 10-week conversational seminar that invites fellows to deepen their understanding of Judaism on their own terms. We’re interested in asking lots of big questions in the context of community. Big questions like, “how do I want to build friendships?” “what is constructive conflict?” and “what is intimacy?” We make no claims about the “right” way to practice or not to practice Judaism. Our job is to help you explore the tradition in a safe space in conversation with a diverse group of people. That means we’ll ask a lot of “big questions”, but we don’t purport to have any of the big answers. Students who attend all 10 sessions will receive a $300 stipend.
Questions? E-mail Rabbi Isaama isaama.goldstein-stoll@yale.edu

Urim Fellowship

Community is one of the central pillars of Judaism. The Urim fellowship recognizes the sacredness of building relationships and Jewish community, and invites you to hone your skills in this work. In this fellowship we will meet once a week to build and discuss leadership, community organizing, and human-centered design thinking skills. But most importantly, we will actively be working to build community and foster new relationships among Yale’s Jewish student body. Every week fellows will reach out to at least one peer for a one on one conversation. As we build these personal relationships we will also work together to foster new Jewish communities. 

Strong candidates will either have a) a specific constituency in mind that they would like to engage as well as a network within that constituency. Or b) an interest in fostering new relationships and cultivating belonging among Jews of diverse backgrounds. We encourage everyone to apply regardless of your Jewish knowledge and background.  Students who complete this fellowship will receive a $300 stipend. Send questions to Rabbi Isaama at isaama.goldstein-stoll@yale.edu

Marilyn G. and Joseph B. Schwartz ’62 Israel Education Fellowship

Five Sunday sessions of one hour each that serve as ‘Israel 101’, including opportunities to ask questions and engage with topics without prior knowledge  as a requirement.The aim is for participants to come away from this fellowship with a better understanding of Israel’s political, cultural and social diversity, as well as $150 stipend if they attend 4/5 classes. Sessions will take place on Sunday afternoons, dates TBA . No degree of background knowledge is necessary, and all are welcome to sign up. Please contact juli.goodman@yale.edu with any questions.

Tzedek Fellowship

We’re a tight-knit group of Jews who care deeply about social justice and its centrality to Judaism. The Tzedek (Hebrew for ‘justice’) fellowship is built on two pillars: weekly volunteering with IRIS, tutoring refugee students in New Haven Public Schools (though the exact form it will take depends on NHPS’s distance-learning plans), learning about justice work in New Haven, and monthly study of topics selected by fellows – such as reparations, environmental justice, and homelessness – from a Jewish lens. Interested? Send questions to Daniella Shear daniella.shear@yale.edu.

W{holy} Queer and LGBTorah 

W{holy} Queer: The Chaplain’s Office, Office of LGBTQ Resources, and Joseph Slifka Center for Jewish Life invite those of all religious and spiritual persuasions to monthly discussions that explore the intersections of all things queer and religious! Each conversation will have a different topic; come to as many or as few sessions as you please. “Questioning” or not “Out” to those you live with, feel free to participate in the chat! For more information, or to be added to our e-mail list contact Rabbi Isaama: isaama.goldstein-stoll@yale.edu
* This program primarily serves those who identify as LGBTQ+. Those who identify as Allies should consult Rabbi Isaama before attending. 

LGBTorah offers a space to explore queer readings of sacred Jewish texts. Individuals of all orientations, gender identities, and Jewish backgrounds are invited to this bi-weekly study group. Texts will primarily be drawn from Torah Queeries: Weekly Commentary on the Hebrew Bible and Noam Siena’s A Rainbow Thread. Come all year or drop by for one session!

Questions? E-mail Rabbi Isaama isaama.goldstein-stoll@yale.edu 

Chavruta/Chabura (small study group)

We love learning Torah, and we love all of you, and so we really, really love learning Torah with all of you! Form a group of 2-4 of your companions, choose any topic or text, and let us know!
What will we learn? Whatever your soul desires! Talmud, midrash, the weekly parasha, the meaning of life, early-medieval kabbala, late-medieval kabbala, what Jewish prayer means and how it works, what shabbos means and how it works, how to get rich quick, responsa literature, whatever.
Have a only a vague sense of what you’d like to learn but aren’t quite sure? Reach out to us at alex.ozar@yale.edu or lauren.steinberg@yale.edu.

Slifka Independent Projects (SIPs) Grant 

Slifka Independent Projects (SIPs) are an opportunity for Yale students, regardless of enrollment status, to receive support to pursue projects during the 2020-2021 academic year. SIPs can be research-based, community building initiatives, art projects or internships that benefit Yale’s Jewish community. SIPs grant recipients will get access to full or partial funding for their proposals, as well as receive mentorship and cohort-based support for their projects.

Applicants are welcome to apply for a SIPs grant for any subject or topic, with preference given to the following:

  • Ecology + Environmentalism, 
  • Visual Arts
  • Media + Filmmaking
  • Substance Abuse Prevention + Education 
  • Holocaust Education 
  • Israel Politics 
  • Israel Culture
  • Yiddish Art + Culture
  • Medical Ethics
  • Sports + Athletics

For more information, go to https://slifkacenter.org/sips 

Krav Maga

Krav Maga is a self-defense and fighting system developed for the Israeli Defense Force. The martial art is focused primarily on defensive rather than offensive combat, and real world situations. This student led virtual class will include youtube videos for self-paced learning as well as zoom meetings to practice, connect with peers, and perfect your techniques under the guidance of trained peers. 

Interested? Email michelle.barsukov@yale.edu